Professional Training

Our Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT)® trainings provides a strong a strong knowledge base of PRT® research and methodology. Content typically covered includes; Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), History and Development of PRT®, PRT® service delivery model, delineation of pivotal areas and the corresponding interventions (i.e., motivation, responding to multiple cues, self-initiations, and self-management), motivational procedures of PRT® for teaching social-communication (including child attention and clear instructions, maintenance tasks, child choice, contingent reinforcement, reinforcement of communicative attempts, direct and natural reinforcement, types of opportunities for evoking language, creating learning opportunities in the natural environment), facilitating social interactions with typically developing peers, self-management, Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA), and motivational academics. Trainings can be tailored to the specific needs of each agency or school.

Teacher and Aide Training

In a growing effort to provide education and services to teachers and classroom aides, the Koegel Autism Center has developed training and consulation services to support school staff implementing PRT with the students they work with. 

These trainings cover an array of topics that can be feasibly implemented in the school setting. Topics include:

  • Behavior Management
  • Social Facilitation
  • Data Collection
  • Modifications and Accomodations for School Work
  • Independent Living Skills (adolescents)

School Certification

We currently offer on-site professional development workshops for groups across the United States and internationally who are interested in receiving training in Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT). These workshops are lecture style trainings with a focus on video examples to demonstrate the application of each PRT procedure. Case vignettes, group practice, and other hands-on exercises are also incorporated. A question and answer period is included, and allows for participants to engage in a dialogue with trainers and receive individualized support.

Our Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT)® trainings provides a strong a strong knowledge base of PRT® research and methodology. Content typically covered includes; Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), History and Development of PRT®, PRT® service delivery model, delineation of pivotal areas and the corresponding interventions (i.e., motivation, responding to multiple cues, self-initiations, and self-management), motivational procedures of PRT® for teaching social-communication (including child attention and clear instructions, maintenance tasks, child choice, contingent reinforcement, reinforcement of communicative attempts, direct and natural reinforcement, types of opportunities for evoking language, creating learning opportunities in the natural environment), facilitating social interactions with typically developing peers, self-management, Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA), and motivational academics. Trainings can be tailored to the specific needs of each agency or school.

Professionals also have the opportunity to become certified in PRT  at Level I, II and III through on-site workshops. Please visit the following link for more detailed information on our programs: 

http://www.autismprthelp.com/online-prt-certification.php

Academics

Interventions in the School Setting

The school setting is an ideal mechanism for delivering interventions for autism, as children are in school many hours a day and for majority of their developing years. The UCSB Koegel Autism Center is devoted to developing interventions in the school setting that improves communciation and socialization, while expanding the student's range of interests. These interventions target the following areas:

  • Challenging Behavior
  • Communication
  • Socialization
  • Teacher Training

Motivational Academics 

Additionally, many children with ASDs are often exposed to school work that is challenging or simply uninteresting, leading to mild to severe disruptive behaviors used to avoid a particular task. However, by incorporating specific motivational variables, such as child choice, intersprersal of maintenence tasks, and natural reinforcers, children will increase their academic performance and interest while decreasing disruptive behaviors.