Hsiu-Zu Ho presents the CORE lecture “Beyond the Breadwinner? Father Involvement in Taiwanese Society” on April 16

Tuesday, April 8, 2014
Dr. Hsiu-Zu Ho

Professor Hsiu-Zu Ho, a Professor of Education and Fulbright Senior Scholar 2012-13, will give the free talk  “Beyond the Breadwinner? Father Involvement in Taiwanese Society” on Wednesday, April 16 at 12 noon in the Don Gevirtz Boardroom, 4th Floor, Education Building. The event is sponsored by the Gevirtz School’s CORE (Conversations on Research in Education) Lunch Series. All members of the UCSB community are invited to attend; please bring your lunch – light refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to Carla Whitacre by Monday, April 14 if you plan on attending: cwhitacre@education.ucsb.edu

In recent decades Taiwan’s dynamic socio-economic growth and political transformations have brought changes to a number of traditions, including gender roles. In this presentation, Professor Ho will discuss her Fulbright experience in Taipei, Taiwan and her research on father involvement in Taiwanese society. This body of research uses both quantitative and qualitative methodologies and covers investigations on: progressive portrayals of father roles in Taiwanese cultural media; mother-father differences in parental role beliefs; mother-father differences in participation of specific activities; the various roles of fathers in today’s Taiwanese society; and the direct and indirect influences of father involvement on student academic achievement.

Hsiu-Zu Ho is Professor in the Department of Education and Associate Dean of the Gevirtz School, focusing on the school’s international activities. Her research interests are in cultural and gender variations in human development, parent involvement and student academic achievement, and international education systems. Professor Ho received a 2012-13 Fulbright Senior Scholar Award to investigate father involvement in the everyday lives and education of young students in Taiwan. Her recent publications on this topic include investigations that utilized both quantitative and qualitative methodologies in examining various aspects of father involvement in Taiwanese society. She has also conducted studies examining ethnic variations in parent involvement and student academic achievement in U.S. populations. Her past cross-cultural/cross-national studies have investigated cultural and gender variations in attitudes, beliefs, and practices of parents and students as they influence academic achievement (some studies specifically focusing on mathematics achievement).

[Hsiu-Zu Ho is available for interviews; contact George Yatchisin at 805-893-5789.]