Jennifer Flashman presents the CORE lecture “Friendship Dynamics, Academic Achievement, and Race: A Longitudinal Test of the ‘Acting White’ Hypothesis” on May 28

Tuesday, May 27, 2014
Jennifer Flashman

Jennifer Flashman will give the free talk “Friendship Dynamics, Academic Achievement, and Race: A Longitudinal Test of the ‘Acting White’ Hypothesis” on Wednesday, My 28 at 12 noon in the Don Gevirtz Boardroom, 4th Floor, Education Building. The event is sponsored by the Gevirtz School’s CORE (Conversations on Research in Education) Lunch Series. All members of the UCSB community are invited to attend; please bring your lunch – light refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to Carla Whitacre if you plan on attending: cwhitacre@education.ucsb.edu.

Dr. Flashman’s research focuses on friendship and the role it plays in affecting the achievement trajectories of youth. In this presentation, she will discuss recent work on differences in friendship patterns across race and ethnicity. Using dynamic network models and data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, this project addresses the often-ignored social complexities of peer relationships and their broader implications for race and ethnic achievement disparities.

Flashman is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Center for Research on Educational Opportunity at the University of Notre Dame.