Department of Education offers a graduate writing workshop on frameworks by Dr. Robby Nadler

Friday, October 4, 2019
Robby Nadler

The Gevirtz School’s Department of Education invites its graduate students to a writing workshop with graduate writing specialist Dr. Robby Nadler on Tuesday, October 22 from 12 noon – 12:50 pm in ED 1205. This brief talk will help students better understand their research and how to write about their work by outlining the features of theoretical and conceptual frameworks, explaining why they are different, and providing strategies for how to include them in student writing.

One of the hallmarks of social science research—which often distinguishes it from humanities and STEM research and writing contexts—is the presence of frameworks. Specifically, theoretical and conceptual frameworks provide guidance for how a research question is to be considered and/or methodology is conceived for investigation. This is to say that research projects and articles are in part driven by these components. However, because they are not associated with general writing contexts, students are often not prepared to write about frameworks.

Lunch will be provided. RSVP to Brenda at brendal@ucsb.edu by Tuesday, October 15 so the proper food amount is supplied.

Robby Nadler holds terminal degrees from the University of Montana (M.F.A.) and the University of Georgia (Ph.D.). At the latter, he directed the campus’ five writing centers and was responsible for developing the university’s dissertation/thesis boot camps, creating and teaching the university’s graduate writing courses, and transforming the campus writing centers in research units. His research fields focus on nontraditional sites of basic writing, including graduate writing, STEM composition, and writing centers. For his efforts, he was awarded the 2018 Council on Basic Writing’s Innovation Award, which is granted to one institution annually and represents the highest honor in the field of basic writing praxis. He is also author of the book jesse garon writes a love letter, a magical realism memoir about holocaust narratives and Elvis Presley that was inspired during his Fulbright grant in Israel.